ACRYLONITRILE BUTADIENE STYRENE (ABS)

Advantages

  1. Dimensional stability
  2. Toughness — even at low temperatures
  3. Chemical resistance

Limitations

  1. Poor weatherability
  2. Poor solvent resistance
  3. High smoke generation when burned

Overview

The ABS three monomer system can be tailored to yield a good balance of properties. Basically, styrene contributes ease of processing characteristics, acrylonitrile imparts chemical resistance and increased surface hardness, and the butadiene contributes impact strength and overall toughness.

ABS is considered the best of the styrenic family. It is hard, tough and rigid.

Glass-reinforced ABS has improved properties over the non-reinforced resin. This advantage opens a wide range of high performance opportunities, particularly in applications requiring high strengths, rigidity and dimensional stability.

ABS that contains 40% glass fiber exhibits 15,000 psi tensile strength, 20,000 psi flexural strength and 1.3 million psi modulus. It also has the highest heat deflection temperature of the styrenic family and low mold shrinkage.

ABS is severely attacked by some solvents. Prolonged exposure to aromatic solvents, ketones and esters should be avoided. This poor resistance to solvents does allow solvent bonding as a means of assembly.